How do I measure the colors?

          Although, all the reviews are done in an informal way just following a few common steps, such as : same cameras, same 3-4 lenses, same scanner same scanning process, not expired film. I also wanted to bring a more “scientific” comparison since different periods of the year, distinct times of the day or just different weather can make the film vary a lot, even using the same kind of film. So I opted to download* and print this watercolor mixing chart:

colortest

In the chart we will be able to see the influence of the film on the different colors. I will select a red, yellow, green and blue as a guideline, these ones here:

color-reference

After that, I will run an algorithm on GIMP  called sample average color, that will give us something like this:

red
Running the Sample Average Color Script on the Red square while testing the Fujicolor Industrial 100.

It will give us the amount of red green and blue on each selected “square” plus a sample of the average color.

The room will be always in the same light conditions, a couple of indirect 5500K lightbulbs  and the camera is shot in a tripod with a Nikon 50mm f1.8D. Generally it will be take in between f5.6-f11 with different shutter speeds. Trusting the light meter in the camera (Nikon F100 and a Nikon FM).

vlcsnap-2017-10-05-23h18m20s691.png

 

*Thanks to the Flickr profile “Denn” for posting  different watercolor mixing charts with an open Creative Commons license, it really matched the aesthetics of this small project.

flickr-logo  Denn

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6 thoughts on “How do I measure the colors?

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